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Leccinum versipelle / Leccinum aurantiacum
Orange Birch Bolete / Orange Oak Bolete 

These two Bolete mushrooms are very similar to one another and often get mistaken for one another. Even we have trouble telling the difference!! But nonetheless both of these species are EDIBLE if cooked properly (15 - 20 minutes recommended) These ones along with some other boletes around the woods here sneak up on ya blending in with the leaves that have become a vibrant orange, amazing. Maybe we'll have to do a recipe one day for these! Might need to get these under a microscope (coming soon)

Kingdom : Fungi
Division : Basidiomycota
Class : Agaricomycetes
Order : Boletales
Family : Boletaceae
Genus : Leccinum 
Species :
Leccinum versipelle / aurantiacum
Orange Cap Birch Bolete / Orange Cap Oak Bolete

Where to Find This Mushroom in the Wild?

The Orange Cap Bolete *check out Brown Birch Boletes to spot the differences*  grows across most deciduous and coniferous forests preferring moist soil conditions and being tucked away in the tall grass. With these gorgeous choice edibles being mycorrhizal their name is giving which trees will be nearby! Oak trees and Birch trees being most popular but to not exclude other hardwoods. 

But does this mushroom even exist?? Well depending on where you live in North America it can go by a completely different species name. Example being the Aspen Orange Cap Bolete which is virtually the exact same as Leccinum aurantiacum besides which tree they grow under. Either way both are choice edibles and toxic unless cooked properly! But these bastards blend in very well with the changing color of the leaves. Don't be afraid to work out those legs and squat down to the mushrooms height and get a closer look for these!

 

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Description of the Mushroom

Cap: convex with occasional wave like ridges in the cap. Slight depressions in areas with age. Typically a copper orange hue to the cap and stays a consistent coloring most times. The caps of these feels less *sponge like* compared to a Brown Birch Bolete. The margin of the mushroom extends a bit to cover a slight amount of the pore surface.
Stem / Stipe: Small darker scales on the stem with more near the base, Varying amounts from mushroom to mushroom. light tan to white in color. Bruises a purplish hue and almost being blue near the volva. 
Pores:  Pore surface is light tan to near white in color darkening to gray when damaged. Can bruise very easily. Pores lead to tube layers to the white flesh that turn purple when bruised. Easily removable from the flesh of the cap and the stipe is easily detachable. Maggots love to infest these and other Leccinum species!
Hymenium: adnate
Spore Print: Spore Print on aurantiacum is more reddish/brown/clay/light tan in color versipelle slight more of a green tint to the spore print, olive hues. 
Ecology:  grows across most deciduous and coniferous forests preferring moist soil conditions and being tucked away in the tall grass. With these gorgeous choice edibles being mycorrhizal their name is giving which trees will be nearby! Oak trees and Birch trees being most popular but to not exclude other hardwoods. 
Edibility: Choice edible (remove pores from flesh as usually it may be crawling with critters) remove discolored flesh
 

Interesting Facts

the satisfaction that comes from peeling the flesh away on the cap is a top tier mycophile feeling in my opinion. But when you cook this mushroom, the flesh turns dark! don't worry as most Bolete Mushrooms will darken when heated up. Be careful when preparing these as some people have reported gastral and digestive issues related to consumption of undercooked mushrooms! 

Edibility / Recipes

Coming Soon!


 

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Sources Listed Here

Choice Edible

adnate

Mycorrhizal





 

Spore Print on aurantiacum is more reddish/brown/clay/light tan in color

versipelle slight more of a green tint to the spore print, olive hues. 

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